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1. Wide of archaeologists working on archaeological site of the Wari civilization 
2. Mid of archaeologists carrying out excavation work 
3. Close of archaeological remains being cleaned up by an archaeologist
4. Mid of archaeologist cleaning archaeological remains
5. Wide of archaeological site of the Wari civilization 
6. Mid of pyramid where the archaeological remains of the Wari culture were found
7. Mid of Cristobal Krzysztof, archaeologist leading excavation work 
8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Cristobal Krzysztof, archaeologist leading the excavation project:
"The importance of this finding lies in the fact that this is the first time that the first major tomb from the Wari empire has ever been excavated by archaeologists."
9. Mid of archaeologist observing the excavation site
10. Various of excavation site
11. Mid of skeletal remains said to belong to a woman from the noble class of the Wari culture
12. Close of same
12. Pan of skeletal remains
13. Close of skeletal remains
14. Close of forensic archaeologist measuring a human skull found on the site
15. Mid of forensic archaeologist examining remains
16. Wide of archaeological site of the Wari civilization 
17. Mid of same 
18. Mid of onlookers at archaeological site
STORYLINE:
A team of Polish and Peruvian archaeologists have discovered an ancient tomb from the Wari culture on the coast of Peru's Ancash region.
They discovered the remains of 63 mummies and 1,200 ornamental pieces of gold, silver and ceramics.
The tomb is estimated to be 1200 years old and its finding confirms the existence of the Wari empire.
The research that led to the tomb's discovery began less than three years ago when archaeologists began excavating the top part of a pyramid known as El Castillo, which is located in an agricultural area of the town of Huarmey, 276 kilometres north of Lima.
"The importance of this finding lies in the fact that this is the first time that the first major tomb from the Wari empire has ever been excavated by archaeologists," said Cristobal Krzysztof, an archaeologist leading the excavation project.
Archaeologists had to remove a layer of crushed stone that was one metre high and weighed 33 tons.
They found at first six human skeletons, which they said were the guardians of the tomb. 
Under these six skeletons, archaeologists found 57 mummies of women belonging to the Wari noble class.
They were found in a sitting position and are believed to have been wives or concubines of an elite member of the Wari empire.
All the women had been buried with jewels, fine ceramics and other objects such as bowls and needles.
The Ministry of Culture said work on the site will continue and in a few months they will announce the results of the investigation.
Peru was the cradle of the Inca Empire and dozens of pre-Inca cultures that settled over its territory, including the Paracas, Nazca, Mochica and Chimu, among others.


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