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Spanish/Nat

A museum in Peru has opened an exhibit of the remains of a young girl buried 200  years B-C.

The mummy - who was found with her long hair intact - is believed to be a princess who  was buried alive.

She was found along with other well-preserved artefacts.

Peruvian archaeologists say the well-preserved remains of the young girl date back  some 200 years B-C.

The mummy is now being shown at the first exhibit of its kind in the neighbourhood of  San Isidro in the capital, Lima.

The remains, known as "The Mummy of the Long Hair",  are being studied in order to  determine its real identity, 

Scientists believe its roots are Inca and pre-Inca.

The mummy was found after four years of work in the Huaca Huallamarca site.

The area served as a ceremonial centre as well as a cemetery.

Archaeologists have discovered several funeral grounds which they have not opened  yet.

At least 85 mummies have been found but they were completely covered and they are  not as attractive and well-preserved as the long-haired mummy.

The find of the mummy has excited scientists who say it will give them insight on the  true origins of the Lima culture which the conquistadores found in Huallamarca.

The museum director believes the girl was a member of a high ranking group.

SOUNDBITE: (In Spanish)
"It's a very well preserved mummy of a very young girl which has a peculiar long hair  which probably prevented her from performing domestic tasks. Her hands are very  delicate showing that within her social group she had a superior status."
SUPER CAPTION: Dr. Arturo Jimenez Borja, Museum Director

Besides the mummy, the expeditions found well-preserved artefacts which  archaeologists believe belonged to the girl.

The mayor of San Isidro hopes to find more mummies in the next expeditions.

SOUNDBITE: (In Spanish)
"We hope there are many more, maybe not as beautiful as this one, but at the end  what's important is what they took with them when they were buried, to see how they  lived."
SUPER CAPTION: Carlos Neuhas Rizo Patron, Mayor of San Isidro

The exhibition coincides with the discovery two weeks ago of the remains of three  people who were apparently sacrificed to Inca gods 500 years ago.

But scientists emphasised the long-haired mummy is not related at all with the other  three found on Mount Ampato.

Archaeologists believe the girl - who could have been 23 years old - was buried alive.

It is believed that at least three or four pre-Columbian civilisations lived in the  Huallamarca valley.


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